NHS Cancer Tests Service Crisis Brings the Tension

 

110414-N-OV243-018 SAN DIEGO (April 14, 2011) Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Selina Arzu, a lab technician, draws a patient's blood in the Naval Medical Center San Diego Tricare Outpatient Clinic (TOC) East County. The clinic provides healthcare to more than 1,800 non-active duty beneficiaries ranging from newborn to age 65. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea A. Blom/Released)

110414-N-OV243-018
SAN DIEGO (April 14, 2011) Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Selina Arzu, a lab technician, draws a patient’s blood in the Naval Medical Center San Diego Tricare Outpatient Clinic (TOC) East County. The clinic provides healthcare to more than 1,800 non-active duty beneficiaries ranging from newborn to age 65. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea A. Blom/Released)

Cancer Research UK has warned that NHS services are struggling to manage with the increase of cancer tests requests, which causes stress for people.

More staff are needed to keep up with growing numbers of people asking to take the biopsies and blood samples for the cancer test.

 

According to the Cancer Research report, which has been published on Wednesday, 23rd of November:

 

  • A significant chunk of the workforce is nearing retirement age and there are not enough new graduates to fill the void.
  • In the next 5-10 years there will be a shortage of consultants across all the areas of pathology.
  • Soon other cancer diagnosis services, such as scans or endoscopies will become the same problem as biopsies and blood sample taking.

 

It raises the fear that waiting for the test being undertaken can cause in late diagnosis.

Here is some people response on today’s news:

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It is vital to be diagnosed early as Cancer Research UK statistics shows that one in two of us will have cancer at some point.

 

Prof Peter Sasieni, based at Queen Mary University of London, says:

“Cancer is primarily a disease of old age, with more than 60 per cent of all cases diagnosed in people aged over 65. If people live long enough then most will get cancer at some point”.

 

However, she also stresses the importance of other factors, which influences the cancer at any age.

Professor says that people can do a lot to make themselves more resistant, it includes: “giving up smoking, being more active, drinking less alcohol and maintaining a healthy weight”.

 

It is important to understand that being adult does not mean that you are not in a cancer risk group.

You can be if you have bad habits or strong genes inheritance from your relatives, who had cancer.

According to the Cancer Research UK, the risk factors for adults include: age, genetics, infections, lifestyle and much more.

See picture below for further information and visit www.cancerresearchuk.org to explore the cancer risk factors in-depth.

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Berta Balsyte

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